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Editorial

      As The Journal embarks on its 10th year of publication, we will mark this important milestone with a series of review and special articles that explore the most vital topics of pain research, presented by leaders in both laboratories and treatment clinics. The introductory article, Endothelin Receptors and Pain, by Alla Khodorova, Jean-Pierre Montmayeaur and Gary Strichartz, appears in this issue.
      • Khodorova A.
      • Montmayeur J.-P.
      • Strichartz G.
      Endothelin receptors and pain.
      The authors discuss endogenous endothelin peptides and their participation in pain-related processes. A range of topics will be featured throughout Volume 10, including gender and pain, racial disparities, pain imaging, pain and aging, individual differences in pain sensitivity, central sensitization, and more.
      The February issue will feature a valuable conspectus on treatment for chronic noncancer pain. The Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Chronic Opioid Therapy in Chronic Noncancer Pain, prepared for the American Pain Society (APS) / American Academy of Pain Medicine Opioids Guidelines Panel, is based on research conducted at the Oregon Evidence-based Practice Center, supported by the APS. Effective therapy for chronic noncancer pain demands precise skills and knowledge for both treatment and management of risks. While evidence is limited in some areas of this field, the guideline provides recommendations developed by a multidisciplinary expert panel following a systematic review of the evidence.
      The Journal's solid editorial content helps maintain our goal of distinction among interdisciplinary pain research journals. The Journal's Impact Factor (ISI Thomson Scientific, Philadelphia, PA) – now 3.58 – has climbed significantly again this year, as it has with each passing volume. It currently ranks in the top 17% of pain-related journals within the ISI specialty category of “clinical neurology” and in the top 30% within the “neurosciences” category.
      Recent figures show an increase of 25 percent in new submissions, with slight increases in basic science papers and critical review articles. The Journal continues to attract contributors from around the globe; authors from 33 countries submitted manuscripts in 2008—55% of manuscript submissions are from authors outside the US, evidence of our growing international standing. This year, we will publish almost 1,200 pages – nearly 4 times the amount published in our first volume.
      A fresh redesign presented during Volume 9 has offered dynamic color images on each month's cover. Authors and readers are reminded to make suggestions for cover images. I also remind readers that essential color may be published at no cost to APS members, many of whom published their work this year with color images. Our Case Reviews in Pain feature, edited by Judy Paice, continues to draw enthusiasm and discourse.
      As we begin a new year and volume of publication, I extend sincere thanks to Editorial Board members for their guidance and advice and to the many referees – more than 900, recognized at the end of this issue - who have provided exceptional service to The Journal. The increasing impact of The Journal rests in large part on the contributions of the Editorial Board and referees. New members to the Editorial Board include: Kathy Albers, Michael Geisser, Lance McCracken, Koichi Noguchi, Marta Segerdahl and Todd Vanderah. I also acknowledge with gratitude the service of those who have rotated off the Board: Dan Carr, Ken Casey, Howard Fields and Linda Sorkin. Julie Eisele, our Managing Editor, has managed us all with a firm hand and good grace, for which I am very appreciative. All of these components have enabled The Journal's amazing progress over its first decade.
      Sadly, 2008 also marked the untimely death of a dear friend and colleague in the pain research community. Mitchell Max was a dedicated member of The Journal's Editorial Board and was also a frequent contributor and reviewer. He was a senior investigator at The University of Pittsburgh's Center for Pain Research, which he joined after a distinguished 20-year appointment at the National Institutes of Health. His contributions to the field of pain research are immeasurable, and we will all be the poorer for his passing. An obituary follows this editorial.

      Reference

        • Khodorova A.
        • Montmayeur J.-P.
        • Strichartz G.
        Endothelin receptors and pain.
        J Pain. 2009; 10 (4-28)