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      We appreciate the thoughtful comments of Drs. Mackey and Davis.
      • Mackey S.
      Central neuroimaging of pain.
      • Davis K.
      Is chronic pain a disease? Evaluating pain and nociception through self report and neuroimaging.
      However, we would like to draw the reader’s attention to a few aspects of their responses that may help to clarify differences between us.
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      References

        • Mackey S.
        Central neuroimaging of pain.
        J Pain. 2013; 14: 328-331
        • Davis K.
        Is chronic pain a disease? Evaluating pain and nociception through self report and neuroimaging.
        J Pain. 2013; 14: 332-333
      1. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for Prostate Cancer: Current Recommendation. Available at: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/prostatecancerscreening.htm. Accessed December 28, 2012

      Linked Article

      • Central Neuroimaging of Pain
        The Journal of PainVol. 14Issue 4
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          Central neuroimaging of pain has emerged as an effective way to assess central nervous system correlates and potentially also to characterize mechanisms of human pain perception, modulation, and plasticity. Central neuroimaging has allowed us to open windows into the brain to observe the roles of attention,18 anticipation,11 fear/anxiety,16 placebo,2 direct control,6 and other factors. We now better understand the changes in the brain associated with chronicity of pain,1,28 the effects of opioids,26,27 and effects of nonopioid therapies.
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      • Is Chronic Pain a Disease? Evaluating Pain and Nociception Through Self-Report and Neuroimaging
        The Journal of PainVol. 14Issue 4
        • Preview
          We intuitively understand what is meant by the term “disease.” Surprisingly though, there is no agreement as to the precise definition of a “disease.”10 Definitions and classifications are important clinically and scientifically and should be based on science and medical facts. However, there are societal, political, and economic implications to classifying a condition as a disease, and this can impact the resources and effort to understand, treat, and cure. The article in this issue by Sullivan et al11 asks whether chronic pain should be considered a “disease” and whether neuroimaging can provide evidence for such a designation.
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