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Pan-Canadian Estimates of Chronic Pain Prevalence From 2000 to 2014: A Repeated Cross-Sectional Survey Analysis

  • Matthew S. Shupler
    Affiliations
    International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

    School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
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  • John K. Kramer
    Correspondence
    Address reprint requests to John K. Kramer, University of British Columbia, Blusson Spinal Cord Centre, 818 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V5Z 1M9, Phone: 604.675.8876.
    Affiliations
    International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

    School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
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  • Jacquelyn J. Cragg
    Affiliations
    International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
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  • Catherine R. Jutzeler
    Affiliations
    International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

    School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
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  • David G.T. Whitehurst
    Affiliations
    International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada

    Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluations, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada
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Published:November 29, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2018.10.010

      Abstract

      Recent temporal trends in the population prevalence of chronic pain in Canada on a national and provincial level are unknown. Five cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey (2000/2001, 2007/2008, 2009/2010, 2011/2012, and 2013/2014) were used to derive population-based estimates of the self-reported prevalence of chronic pain. Sensitivity analyses examined chronic pain prevalence among those reporting no other chronic health conditions. The prevalence of chronic pain among the general Canadian population increased by almost 4.0% (to 21.0%) in 2011/2012, after being in the range of 15.7 to 17.2% from 2000 to 2009/2010. The sudden increase in prevalence was observed 1) across all provinces in Canada, 2) in all age categories, and 3) among Canadians with no other chronic health conditions. Increasing chronic pain prevalence in Canada, most significantly occurring between 2010 and 2012, and including among healthy and young individuals, emphasizes the need for targeted research and resources to help alleviate chronic pain.

      Perspective

      This study uncovers a significant increase in chronic pain prevalence in Canada between 2009/2010 and 2011/2012, driven by younger Canadians that are free of the most common chronic health conditions. This discovery emphasizes the importance of further directed research and resources to help mitigate the trend of increasing chronic pain.

      Key words

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