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Key Learning Statements for Persistent Pain Education: An Iterative Analysis of Consumer, Clinician and Researcher Perspectives and Development of Public Messaging

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Denotes equal first author contributions.
    Hayley B. Leake
    Footnotes
    1 Denotes equal first author contributions.
    Affiliations
    IIMPACT in Health, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Centre for Impact, Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, Australia
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Denotes equal first author contributions.
    Amelia Mardon
    Footnotes
    1 Denotes equal first author contributions.
    Affiliations
    IIMPACT in Health, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
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  • Tasha R. Stanton
    Affiliations
    IIMPACT in Health, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
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  • Daniel S. Harvie
    Affiliations
    IIMPACT in Health, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
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  • David S. Butler
    Affiliations
    IIMPACT in Health, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
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  • Emma L. Karran
    Affiliations
    IIMPACT in Health, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
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  • Dianne Wilson
    Affiliations
    IIMPACT in Health, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
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  • John Booth
    Affiliations
    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
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  • Trevor Barker
    Affiliations
    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Lived experience advocate, Yorta Yorta Land, Australia
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  • Pene Wood
    Affiliations
    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    School of Molecular Sciences, College of Science, Health & Engineering, La Trobe University, Bendigo, Victoria
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  • Kal Fried
    Affiliations
    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Rehabilitation Medicine Group, Boonwurrung Land, Melbourne, Australia
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  • Chris Hayes
    Affiliations
    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Hunter Integrated Pain Service, Awabakal Land, John Hunter Hospital, New Lambton Heights, Australia
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  • Lissanthea Taylor
    Affiliations
    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Brain Changer, Canberra, Australia

    Parkway Health, Shanghai, China
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  • Melanie Macoun
    Affiliations
    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Australian Capital Territory Pain Centre, Ngunnawal Country, Canberra, Australia
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  • Amanda Simister
    Affiliations
    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Persistent Pain Clinic, Shoalhaven District Memorial Hospital, Nowra, Australia
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  • Author Footnotes
    2 Denotes equal senior author contributions.
    G. Lorimer Moseley
    Footnotes
    2 Denotes equal senior author contributions.
    Affiliations
    IIMPACT in Health, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    2 Denotes equal senior author contributions.
    Carolyn Berryman
    Correspondence
    Address reprint requests to Carolyn Berryman, PhD, MScMed, MAppSc, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, PO Box 2471, Adelaide 5001, Australia.
    Footnotes
    2 Denotes equal senior author contributions.
    Affiliations
    IIMPACT in Health, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    Pain Revolution, Kaurna Country, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

    School of Biomedicine, Kaurna Country, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 Denotes equal first author contributions.
    2 Denotes equal senior author contributions.
Published:August 03, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2022.07.008

      HIGHLIGHTS

      • ‘Real world evidence’ via quality audit used to inform pain education objectives.
      • People who experienced recovery from persistent pain answered open-ended questions.
      • Key Learning Statements iteratively generated based on consumer and expert review.
      • Pain education and health campaign resources educed from Key Learning Statements.

      Abstract

      Over the last decade, the content, delivery and media of pain education have been adjusted in line with scientific discovery in pain and educational sciences, and in line with consumer perspectives. This paper describes a decade-long process of exploring consumer perspectives on pain science education concepts to inform clinician-derived educational updates (undertaken by the authors). Data were collected as part of a quality audit via a series of online surveys in which consent (non-specific) was obtained from consumers for their data to be used in published research. Consumers who presented for care for a persistent pain condition and were treated with a pain science education informed approach were invited to provide anonymous feedback about their current health status and pain journey experience 6, 12 or 18 months after initial assessment. Two-hundred eighteen consumers reported improvement in health status at follow-up. Results of the surveys from 3 cohorts of consumers that reported improvement were used to generate iterative versions of ‘Key Learning Statements’. Early iteration of these Key Learning Statements was used to inform the development of Target Concepts and associated community-targeted pain education resources for use in public health and health professional workforce capacity building initiatives.

      Perspective

      This paper reflects an explicit interest in the insights of people who have been challenged by persistent pain and then recovered, to improve pain care. Identifying pain science concepts that consumers valued learning provided valuable information to inform resources for clinical interactions and community-targeted pain education campaigns.

      Key words

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